What Looks Cool Under a Microscope?


In the fascinating world of microscopy and all of the eye-opening wonders it reveals, parents and children alike are curious and want to know what looks cool under a microscope.  


Here are links to MicroscopeMaster’s experiment pages where simple household items and more can be viewed under the microscope with step by step instructions presented as well as our observations.

 

Although the list below can be viewed with a simple microscope (or pocket microscope) without high powered lenses you will find the observations more fascinating using higher magnification. 

 

Here at MicroscopeMaster, we hope that you enjoy using your microscope as much as we do.  Let us know how we can help you further enjoy the world of microscopy and you can add to the list of ‘What looks cool under a microscope?" through our contact us form. 





More ideas below:


Sand 

Snowflakes

Ants

Worm

Chalk

Glass

Paper

Cement

Dirt/Soil



If you are beginning to use your microscope, here are some helpful links:


Another type of fun microscope to own is the USB Digital Computer Microscope

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